Back Pain: Don’t Let History Repeat Itself!

History doesn’t have to repeat itself, right? If you are suffering from back pain, find out if other family members are suffering from back pain, too. Surprisingly, back pain issues can run in the family – especially a herniated disc. Research shows that those who suffer from a herniated disc are four times more likely to face a similar problem if another family has suffered a pain-related issue, too.

Do you know your family’s health history?

It’s always good to know your family’s health history when it comes to significant medical issues. You should at least be aware of health problems in your immediate family: Parents and siblings. The further out on the family tree you can get, however, the more forewarned you’ll be — grandparents, your parents’ siblings, and your cousins can also provide telling info. It’s not important to track every cough and cold; you just want to know about major illnesses and chronic conditions.

What are your choices?

What disease or health problem are you tracking? Is it back pain or something similar? Find out what’s available to you. If you know, for example, that you have a parent and a grandparent who suffer from chronic back pain, it’s important to rule out non-genetic elements that could be the root of the problem. For example, working at a physically demanding job isn’t something that’s hereditary (well, maybe unless you inherit the family farm). Other health issues that can contribute to back pain, like obesity, can be addressed with preventative measures. Learning about health problems that “run in the family” can help you determine whether there are other factors you have that may increase your chances of developing one of these problems.

Again, let’s not allow history to repeat itself. When you consult with Dr. Solomon Kamson, talk to him about your family tree when it comes to illness and chronic pain. Osteoporosis, arthritis, or even a bum knee is important to bring up as well. Knowing what health issues you may be more likely to face — even if they aren’t causing you trouble now — can help to determine a course of action that will better help you to find relief from pain.